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PhishMe releases new tool to help SMB’s fend off phishing scams

phishme releases new tool to help smbs fend off phishing scams

 August 14, 2017

Phishing mails are becoming too much of a problem just because of its sheer number. Scammers have more reasons than one to resort to phishing and the thing is, it is still working! It is simple to create, can give you nearly all the details associated with the account and it works, again and again.

It’s hard for companies to keep track of all the emails being sent to the thousands of employees working under them since each of them receive hundreds of emails. So the problem is, how to protect the company and its employees. Although phishing is a pretty simple and straightforward scam, it can still be successful.

The solution is to train each employee to identify and dismiss such emails and such a task can be out of reach for Small and Medium size business (SMB) due to cost or whatever constraints they may face. But all those constraints will cease to matter after the launch of PhishMe’s new tool.

The tool, called PhishMe free, is a cloud service that helps SMB’s protect from phishing attacks. The tool is free and will be available to any company with less than 500 employees. The tool is actually a subset of its enterprise product PhishMe Simulator and doesn’t include all the tools you’ll find in the pay version of the service but it puts anti-phishing training within reach of any company regardless of size.

To avail the tool a SMB will have to sign up for the cloud service and PhishMe provides templates that look very similar to recent phishing scams. You can tweak the models a bit to fit in company logo to make it look more realistic, then send it to the employees. In a typical SMB scenario, companies will conduct monthly tests to limit the number of checks and risk making people immune to tests. 

MAGAZINE